Debunking #EggMyths and Chicken ‘N Egg Cob Salad Jars

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I have had the pleasure of working with Burnbrae Farms for a few years now, the highlight of which was when I had the chance to take a tour inside their barns to experience a behind-the-scenes tour of the main production facility of Burnbrae Farms.

We learned all about the different housing systems for hen sand learned how eggs move from the hen to the store.

With over 300,000 hens in their barns, it’s no surprise that Burnbrae Farms is conscientious about their care and the quality of eggs they supply. They are the #1 producer of eggs in Canada, the #1 marketer of specialty eggs {including Omega 3, Omega Pro, Organic, Free Fun and Nature’s Best} and the #1 leader in liquid eggs in Canada.

soberjulie eggs

Debunking Egg Myths

Since that trip I’ve had many friends asking me questions about egg production and I’ve been quite surprised how many egg myths there are. Let’s debunk some of them right now!

*** Myth: Brown and white eggs have different nutritional value.

Fact: There is no difference in nutrition content between a brown shell and a white shell. Flavour or cooking functionality is also not affected by the shell colour. The egg shell colour is determined by the breed of chicken. At Burnbrae, brown eggs are laid by the brown Rhode Island Red hen and white eggs are laid by the White Leghorn. The colour of a hen’s ear area is the indicator, with a white or light spot meaning white eggs. The brown chickens are larger and require more food to make an egg, which is why brown eggs* cost more than white eggs.

*** Myth: An egg a day, is that ok?

Fact: Eggs are recommended for healthy eating, according to the new Dietary Guidelines for Americans issued on January 7, 2106. The expert panel stated that cholesterol in diets is no longer a concern. (For many years, Health Canada has recognized the evidence that dietary cholesterol has little impact on blood cholesterol.) Instead the U.S. guidelines emphasize reducing saturated fats, and eggs contain cholesterol but not a large amount of saturated fat. The 2016 Guidelines recommend three healthy eating patterns, and eggs are included in all three. Eating an egg a day will not increase the risk for heart disease, according to the Harvard School of Public Health. Harvard agrees cholesterol found in food like eggs has very little impact on blood cholesterol.

*** Myth: Double yolk eggs – fact or fiction?

Fact: Eggs with two yolks, called double yolk eggs, are fairly rare. Their shells usually have a ridge in the middle, as if two eggs have been pushed together. Double yolk eggs are usually laid by young hens early in their reproductive cycle. Double yolk eggs are safe to eat. In fact, they are said to bring good luck! Burnbrae offers Super Bon-EE Doubles, but doubles are rare and distribution is limited.

*** Myth: Hens lay more eggs because they are fed hormones or steroids.

Fact: Egg farmers do not feed hormones or steroids to egg-laying hens. The use of steroids and hormones in egg-laying hens has been banned in Canada for over 50 years. Burnbrae has worked diligently to provide excellent hen care, which has improved egg production. Our farmers feed their hens a balanced diet and keep a close watch on them daily to ensure they are healthy. Learn more about hen care from Mike the Chicken Vet.

Chicken ‘N Egg Cob Salad Jars

Chicken 'N Egg Cob Salad Jars recipe

With my focus being on eating well (as natural as possible) and getting in my protein and veggies, I was happy to find this Chicken ‘N Egg Cob Salad Jars on the Burnbrae Farms Recipe Nest

It’s a perfect choice for when I’m running out of the house and need some food to take along!


2 pkg Naturegg™ Omega 3 Hard Boiled Egg Snack Pack 88 g each
2 tbsp each very finely chopped green onion and parsley 30 mL
3 tbsp white wine vinegar 45 mL
2 tsp each Dijon mustard and honey 10 mL
1/4 tsp each salt and pepper 1 mL
1/4 cup canola oil 50 mL
2 cups cooked, cubed chicken breast (about 1 large or 2 small) 500 mL
4 cups lightly packed baby spinach, divided 1 L
1/2 cup each shredded carrot, diced celery and bell pepper 125 mL

1. Halve the eggs and separate the yolks from the whites. Roughly chop the whites; set aside. Press the egg yolks through a fine sieve into a bowl. Stir in the vinegar, onion, parsley, mustard, honey, salt and pepper. Whisk in olive oil until well combined and smooth. (Alternately, combine all the salad dressing ingredients in a mini-chop and pulse until smooth and emulsified.

2. Divide and layer the salad ingredients into four 2 cup (500 mL) canning jars in the following order; chicken, dressing, half of the baby spinach, carrots, celery, chopped egg white, bell pepper and remaining spinach. Place the lid on the jar and reserve in the refrigerator for up to 1 day. Turn out into a dish and toss to serve. Makes 4 servings.

Chicken 'N Egg Cob Salad Jars recipe wide

Egg Nutrition

Eggs are a complete protein source, containing a good balance of all of the essential amino acids in amounts that closely match our body’s needs.

Every large 53g egg provides approximately six grams of protein – along with a variety of vitamins, minerals and important antioxidants like lutein. They’re low in saturated fat, sodium and carbohydrates and are only 70 calories.


7269_Twitter Party Invitation_R1

Join us at the #EggMyths Twitter party where we will bust some of those myths, have fun and attendees will have a chance to earn prizes! Open to Canada, excluding Quebec.



  1. Laurie Bolduc-Cadieux says

    Thanks for sharing. I am always looking for new recipes, especially healthy ones that I can premake and take as needed.

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